Inside Climate News - Today's Climate

  • 11.16.18

    Democrats Prepare to Grill Trump Officials on Environmental Issues in New Congress

    Washington Post

    After regaining control of the House, Democrats are looking to use their newfound power to "put a hot spotlight" on the Trump administration's climate agenda, the Washington Post reports. Although there's a long and varied list of priorities, investigating Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke's alleged ethics violations is at the top.

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  • 11.16.18

    U.S. Starts Process to Open Arctic to Offshore Drilling, Despite Federal Lawsuit

    InsideClimate News

    The Trump administration is advancing a plan to revoke Obama-era protections and open 65 million acres of federal waters in the Arctic to oil and gas drilling. It's already being challenged in court. 

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  • 11.16.18

    At UN Climate Talks, Trump Team Plans Sideshow on Coal

    Reuters

    Despite evidence that coal is becoming less competitive than clean energy, the Trump administration plans to set up a side-event promoting fossil fuels at the annual UN climate talks next month, Reuters reports. It did something similar last year and drew protests.

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NY Times - Global Warming and Climate Change

  • 11.16.18

    Trump Says He’ll Nominate Andrew Wheeler to Head the E.P.A.

    The president made the announcement while leading a Presidential Medal of Freedom ceremony at the White House.
  • 11.15.18

    Where Are the Democrats on Climate Change?

    A reader says the party went missing in the midterms on an important issue.
  • 11.15.18

    Your Children’s Yellowstone Will Be Radically Different

    Climate change is altering America’s first national park so quickly that plants and animals may not be able to adapt.

The Guardian - Keep it in the Ground

  • 11.17.18

    Dozens arrested after climate protest blocks five London bridges

    Thousands of protesters occupied bridges across the Thames over extinction crisis in huge act of peaceful civil disobedience

    Eighty-five people have been arrested as thousands of demonstrators occupied five bridges in central London to voice their concern over the looming climate crisis.

    Protesters, including families and pensioners, began massing on five of London’s main bridges from 10am on Saturday. An hour later, all the crossings had been blocked in one of the biggest acts of peaceful civil disobedience in the UK in decades. Some people locked themselves together, while others linked arms and sang songs.

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  • 11.17.18

    Country diary: waking up to traces of nocturnal animals

    Stamford, Lincolnshire: Leaner months bring night animals closer to us as the hours of our shifts cross

    Something’s been happening while we were asleep. This week four things have made me think this: four mornings after the nights before. Four reminders of the night shift. These dawn traces are harder to spot than the detritus of our own late-night species of reveller, those sheepish shadows occasionally spotted slinking home in the silver light of morning. The harder proof is more forensically enigmatic. Item one, a riffled bin and rubbish strewn on a trajectory of retreat across the garden. Two, a strange little thicket of barn owl feathers in a field; no carcass. Three: two badgers at different roadsides, askew on the kerb, like comatose drunks – but, alas, not. We’ll come back to item four.

    It’s the night season again. Early November, when the clocks shift, the pumpkins rot and the smell of smoke and gunpowder clears from the air to leave darker dark, earlier dark. It’s tempting to think of the nights as longer suddenly, the shade stretched at a stroke. Of course, this is just a contrivance of the clock. But still, what of the night animals? To the non-hibernators, are the long winter nights like our long summer days?

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  • 11.16.18

    'Sad surprise': Amazon fish contaminated by plastic particles

    Scientists in Brazil find first evidence of plastic pollution in Amazon basin freshwater fish

    Scientists have found the first evidence of plastic contamination in freshwater fish in the Amazon, highlighting the extent to which bags, bottles and other waste dumped in rivers is affecting the world’s wildlife.

    Tests on the stomach contents of fish in Brazil’s Xingu River, one of the major tributaries of the Amazon, revealed plastic particles in more than 80% of the species examined, including the omnivorous parrot pacu, herbivorous redhook silver dollar, and meat-eating red-bellied piranha.

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