Inside Climate News - Today's Climate

  • 09.24.20

    Battered, Flooded and Submerged: Many Superfund Sites Are Dangerously Threatened by Climate Change

    InsideClimate News

    When Hurricane Harvey battered Houston in 2017, a damaged Superfund site leaked harmful dioxin chemicals into a nearby river. The spill underscored the growing threat climate change poses to some of the nation's most toxic industrial sites, as extreme weather becomes more frequent and intense and as sea levels rise. Yet the Trump administration is mostly ignoring that threat.

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  • 09.24.20

    In a Bold Move, California’s Governor Issues Ban on Gasoline-Powered Vehicles as of 2035

    InsideClimate News

    If automakers weren't already planning for a rapid transition to zero-emissions vehicles, they probably should now. California Gov. Gavin Newsom issued an executive order on Wednesday that bans the sale of new gasoline-powered cars and trucks as of 2035, an aggressive move to curb emissions that is likely to reverberate across the global auto industry.

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  • 09.24.20

    Inside Clean Energy: In South Carolina, a Happy Compromise on Net Metering

    InsideClimate News

    After years of fighting over solar net metering, a big utility and the solar industry have made peace in South Carolina. Could this be a blueprint for other states? And Tesla has plans for a $25,000 car and a major expansion of battery production. That's a big deal. All that and more in the latest Inside Clean Energy by Dan Gearino.

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NY Times - Global Warming and Climate Change

  • 09.25.20

    Trump Administration to Announce Plan to Open Tongass Forest to Logging

    The effort to open the Alaskan wilderness area, the nation’s largest national forest, has been in the works for about two years.
  • 09.24.20

    Ocean Heat Waves Are Directly Linked to Climate Change

    The “blob” of hotter ocean water that killed sea lions and other marine life in 2014 and 2015 may become permanent.
  • 09.23.20

    California Plans to Ban Sales of New Gas-Powered Cars in 15 Years

    The proposal would speed up the state’s efforts to fight global warming at a time when California is being battered by wildfires, heat waves and other consequences of climate change.

The Guardian - Keep it in the Ground

  • 09.25.20

    Country diary: tufts of grass hide tiny breeding chambers

    Hawkerland, east Devon: We search the tussocks for the intricately woven nests that let us gauge harvest mice numbers

    I’ll never look at a tussock of grass in the same way again. Hidden within this one was a ball of woven fronds that once cradled life like a beating heart at the centre of the dense cluster of stems.

    We had spent more than an hour searching clumps of vegetation beside heathland in east Devon. The light was fading and the two of us, backs bent and several metres apart, moved from tussock to tussock, parting strands to carefully examine the inner recesses. Finally, my expert guide, Sarah Butcher, called me over. Concealed at knee height amid ranks of vertical stalks was a spherical mass, like a tangle of yarn caught in a loom.

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  • 09.24.20

    Tragedy in Tasmania: what are pilot whales, and why do they strand themselves?

    Pilot whales – actually large dolphins – are vulnerable because of their close bonds and way of communicating

    About 380 pilot whales have died in Tasmania in one of the biggest mass strandings of the marine mammals on record.

    Rescuers saved at least 70 of about 470 animals that got stuck on sandbanks and beaches mostly inside Macquarie Harbour on the state’s remote western coast.

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  • 09.24.20

    Pollutionwatch: red sky spells warning when the cause is fire and wood burning

    Smoke absorbs purple and blue light, raising alert for air pollution and climate emergency

    Red sky at dawn and dusk is part of weather lore and apparently a cause for delight or warning among shepherds and sailors. But, as huge areas of forest burn, the crimson colour of skies over the western US is a red alert for our air pollution and climate emergency. Even in New York and Washington DC the sun turned orange. This is because smoke from wood burning strongly absorbs purple and blue light. Longer wavelengths pass through and the sky takes on shades of red.

    This curiosity can be useful. In 2005 Swiss scientists noticed that the particle pollution from wood stoves that filled Alpine villages in winter strongly absorbed ultraviolet light, opening a way to routinely measure wood smoke in our air.

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