Inside Climate News - Today's Climate

  • 09.21.18

    Solar Energy Survives Florence Largely Unscathed

    InsideClimate News

    Faced with Hurricane Florence's powerful winds and record rainfall, North Carolina's solar farms held up with only minimal damage while other parts of the electricity system failed, an outcome that solar advocates hope will help to steer the broader energy debate.

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  • 09.21.18

    Partisan Politics at Independent Energy Regulatory Commission Draws Bipartisan Rebuke

    The Hill

    A top aide at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is being criticized by former officials from both parties who say his overtly partisan statements are compromising the agency's independence.

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  • 09.21.18

    Sale of Coal-Fired Navajo Generating Station to New Operator Falls Through

    Associated Press

    Two companies have dropped their bids to take over the coal-fired Navajo Generating Station in Arizona, making it likely the plant will close next year as planned. The plant can't compete with other energy sources on price, but groups with ties the coal industry wanted to find a buyer to keep it running.

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NY Times - Global Warming and Climate Change

  • 09.21.18

    On the Attack Against Climate Change

    Local groups, individuals and multinational organizations are finding effective ways, big and small, to mitigate the effects.
  • 09.21.18

    With Climate Change No Longer in the Future, Adaptation Speeds Up

    Experts have for years debated the priority of preventing climate change versus adapting to it, but both sides now agree that adjustment is crucial.
  • 09.21.18

    Ice Surveys and Neckties at Dinner: Here’s Life at an Arctic Outpost

    Danish soldiers, scientists and two very sturdy dogs are the only residents of Station Nord in Greenland. Like any remote outpost, there are quirky rules and rituals.

The Guardian - Keep it in the Ground

  • 09.24.18

    Where should you move to avoid climate change misery?

    Heatwaves, hurricanes and floods will make some places in the US inhospitable

    Climate change is fueling heatwaves, hurricanes and floods, gradually making certain places in the US challenging, if not outright miserable, to live in.

    Scientists, and some members of the public, are starting to question where in the US will remain comfortable to call home.

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  • 09.24.18

    'We're moving to higher ground': America's era of climate mass migration is here

    By the end of this century, sea level rises alone could displace 13m people. Many states will have to grapple with hordes of residents seeking dry ground. But, as one expert says, ‘No state is unaffected by this’

    After her house flooded for the third year in a row, Elizabeth Boineau was ready to flee. She packed her possessions into dozens of boxes, tried not to think of the mold and mildew-covered furniture and retreated to a second-floor condo that should be beyond the reach of pounding rains and swelling seas.

    Boineau is leaving behind a handsome, early 20th-century house in Charleston, South Carolina, the shutters painted in the city’s eponymous shade of deep green. Last year, after Hurricane Irma introduced 8in of water into a home Boineau was still patching up from the last flood, local authorities agreed this historic slice of Charleston could be torn down.

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  • 09.24.18

    Meet the 'climate refugees' who already had to leave their homes

    Five people from across the US explain how extreme weather forced them out of their homes – not always to safer ground

    Stephen Lipp, who left New Orleans for Houston

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