Inside Climate News - Today's Climate

  • 01.28.20

    Lawsuits Seeking Damages for Climate Change Face Critical Legal Challenges

    InsideClimate News

    With a dozen state and local government lawsuits aiming to hold fossil fuel companies accountable for the physical impacts of climate change, the U.S. Supreme Court may be the final stop for an industry seeking protection from billion dollar verdicts.

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  • 01.28.20

    With 130-Mile Coast, New Jersey Marks a First in Climate Change Fight

    The New York Times

    New Jersey will become the first state to require that builders take into account the impact of climate change, including rising sea levels, in order to win government approval for projects, Gov. Philip D. Murphy announced on Monday.

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  • 01.28.20

    One-third of Americans Experienced Poor Air Quality Due to Pollution in 2018, Study Says

    The Hill

    In 2018, about one-third of the U.S. population was living in areas that experienced at least 100 days of poor air quality due to air pollution, according to a new study. The most populous regions that met that threshold included the areas surrounding Los Angeles and Chicago.

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NY Times - Global Warming and Climate Change

  • 01.29.20

    Why Hasn’t Harvard Stopped Investing in Fossil Fuels?

    Other campuses are changing. The university, with its $40 billion endowment, is holding out.
  • 01.27.20

    Greta Versus the Greedy Grifters

    Why a 17-year-old is a better economist than Steve Mnuchin.
  • 01.27.20

    What Was Said at Davos on Climate Change

    Global leaders attending the World Economic Forum in Switzerland agree that a rapid response is needed to stave off disaster.

The Guardian - Keep it in the Ground

  • 01.29.20

    More affordable housing 'should be built in national parks'

    Carl Lis OBE, chair of National Parks England, warns young people being priced out of scenic areas

    More affordable housing should be built in England’s national parks to help communities excluded by spiralling prices driven by second homes, the new chair for the authorities has said.

    Carl Lis OBE, chair of National Parks England, has warned that young people and national parks staff are being forced out of some of the most scenic parts of the country by high prices, driven in part by exclusive holiday homes.

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  • 01.29.20

    Grow your own sponges – and other innovative ways to live more sustainably

    From washing out plastic bags to repackaging tissues, Guardian readers offer some more unusual tips for cutting down on waste

    Could your garden be the key to your zero-waste ambitions? Gardeners at the National Trust’s Knightshayes estate in Devon have grown luffa plants to produce their own sponges in an attempt to cut down on waste. They are as easy to cultivate as courgettes, according to the kitchen garden supervisor, Bev Todd. Just sow the seeds in April or May in a warm and sunny spot, and give the plant a support to scramble up. Once the fruit matures and withers, squeeze it to loosen, and peel off the skin. Wash and remove the seeds and flesh, hang to dry and voilà – your own sustainable sponge.

    If you find that inspiring, Zoë Morrison, a blogger and the author of Eco Thrifty Living, has another green-fingered suggestion: “I like to regrow vegetables from their bottoms, so that they can be saved from the bin or the compost heap.” She has successfully regrown lettuce, celery and leeks this way.

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  • 01.29.20

    Almonds are out. Dairy is a disaster. So what milk should we drink?

    A glass of dairy milk produces almost three times more greenhouse gas than any plant-based milk. But vegan options have drawbacks of their own

    For environmentally minded consumers, the news is hard to swallow: almond milk is not healthy for the planet and the popular milk substitute is especially hard on bees. Our recent investigation into the connection between California’s industrialized almond industry and a record 50bn commercial bee deaths created quite a buzz. The widely read story prompted one primary response from readers: “What should we be drinking instead?”

    This is a thorny question, and food sustainability experts are reluctant to single out any one plant milk as best because all have pros and cons.

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