Inside Climate News - Today's Climate

  • 07.17.18

    Rising Seas Could Mean Trouble for Internet Infrastructure

    NPR

    The network of cables and equipment that support the Internet is likely to be damaged by saltwater as sea levels rise, according to new research. A University of Oregon computer scientist suggests that thousands of miles of critical infrastructure in coastal areas is at risk within the next 15 years.

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  • 07.17.18

    Lawmakers Aim to Use Spending Bill to Block Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling

    The Hill

    U.S. House members from both parties would like to use a spending bill to block offshore oil and gas drilling off their states' coasts. The lawmakers are sponsoring amendments to a bill that funds the Interior Department and EPA, blocking Interior funding that would allow drilling in certain areas.

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  • 07.17.18

    Heat Wave Blankets Japan, Kills 14 people Over Long Weekend

    Reuters

    Intense heat was blamed for at least fourteen deaths over a three-day weekend in Japan, and the continuing heat wave is hindering recovery in areas hit by extreme flooding last week, officials say. Read more from ICN about the dangers of rising nighttime temperatures as the planet warms.

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NY Times - Global Warming and Climate Change

  • 07.17.18

    In India, Summer Heat May Soon Be Literally Unbearable

    In cities that are already scorching hot, temperatures and humidity levels are rising to levels that the human body simply can’t tolerate, researchers warn.
  • 07.16.18

    Raising My Child in a Doomed World

    Some would say the mistake was having our daughter in the first place.
  • 07.15.18

    California Is Preparing for Extreme Weather. It’s Time to Plant Some Trees.

    The state expects drier dry years and wetter wet ones in the decades ahead. That means projects to restore river habitats now serve another purpose: battling the coming floods.

The Guardian - Keep it in the Ground

  • 07.18.18

    HS2 accused of breaching cycle crossing commitments along high speed route

    Government-owned company has back-pedalled on its pledge to cycle-proof the line, say campaigners, locking out cyclists for generations to come

    The company building the HS2 high speed rail line is accused of watering down commitments on cycle crossings along the route, in a move campaigners say will endanger lives and lock out cycling for generations to come.

    The government-owned company, HS2 Ltd, was accused of back-pedalling on its legally-binding assurance that it would “cycle-proof” phase 1 of HS2, from London to the West Midlands, earlier this year by Cycling UK, the national cycling charity. The assurances, which became legally binding when they were incorporated into the High Speed Rail Act, stated HS2 Ltd would have a dialogue with the Cycle Proofing Working Group (CPWG), a government advisory body, with the assumption that they would include high quality design standards.

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  • 07.18.18

    Ten species of shark coming to the UK as waters warm – in pictures

    New research has identified the species of shark currently found in hotter parts of the world that could migrate to UK waters by 2050 as the oceans warm

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  • 07.18.18

    Sinking land, poisoned water: the dark side of California's mega farms

    The floor of the Central Valley is slumping, and there is arsenic in the tap water. Now it seems the two problems are connected

    Isabel Solorio can see the water treatment plant from her garden across the street. Built to filter out the arsenic in drinking water, it hasn’t been active since 2007 – it shut down six months after opening when the California town of Lanare went into debt trying to keep up with maintenance costs.

    Related: ‘Nothing to worry about. The water is fine’: how Flint poisoned its people

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