Inside Climate News - Today's Climate

  • 10.23.20

    In Final Debate, Trump and Biden Display Vastly Divergent Views—and Levels of Knowledge—On Climate

    InsideClimate News

    President Trump calls the transition to renewables a "pipe dream." Biden says shifting to wind and solar will address the "existential crisis" of climate change. Here's what else the candidates said about environmental issues in the final debate, which prominently featured climate change for the first time in a general election debate, including a question about environmental justice.

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  • 10.23.20

    Where President Trump and Democratic Nominee Joe Biden Stand on Climate Change

    InsideClimate News

    Looking for more substantive answers on climate change than what the presidential candidates were willing to say during Thursday night's debate? We've got you covered. Our candidate profiles take a deep look at both President Trump's and former Vice President Joe Biden's climate records and what plans they've talked about pursuing if elected in November.

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  • 10.23.20

    Late-Season Wildfires Rampage Through Colorado

    The New York Times

    The East Troublesome Fire exploded through the parched woods and valleys around Colorado's Rocky Mountain National Park on Thursday, offering a grim example of how climate change is making fire seasons longer and more destructive across the West. The fire grew by more than 100,000 acres overnight into Thursday, forcing the park to close and jumping the Continental Divide.

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NY Times - Global Warming and Climate Change

  • 10.25.20

    Biden Pledges Ambitious Climate Action. Here’s What He Could Actually Do.

    If elected, Joe Biden and his allies are preparing to pass climate change legislation, piece by piece — knowing full well that the candidate’s $2 trillion plan would be a tough sell.
  • 10.24.20

    White House Releases New Plan for Seismic Tests in Arctic Refuge

    The survey would bring heavy trucks looking for signs of oil reserves into one of the most remote and pristine parts of the United States.
  • 10.23.20

    Fix, or Toss? The ‘Right to Repair’ Movement Gains Ground

    Both Republicans and Democrats are pursuing laws to make it easier for people to fix cellphones, cars, even hospital ventilators. In Europe, the movement is further along.

The Guardian - Keep it in the Ground

  • 10.25.20

    Bush and koalas found to be threatened by 'gratuitous' NSW land-clearing plan

    State government proposal allows rural landholders to clear up to 25 metres from their fence line

    Tens of thousands of hectares of bush could be at risk under a New South Wales government proposal to allow rural landholders to clear up to 25 metres of land from their property’s fence line, analysis by WWF-Australia shows.

    The NSW government announced this month it planned to amend its Rural Fires Act to allow clearing without an approval on rural property boundaries to reduce bushfire risk.

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  • 10.25.20

    As South Australia now knows, local jobs must be a priority in the clean energy transition | Tom Morton

    The shift to renewables in SA’s Upper Spencer Gulf has been a social as well as technological process

    Future historians will no doubt remember 2020 as the year of Covid-19. But according to veteran climate campaigner Bill McKibben, they may also view it as a turning point, the year the world moved decisively towards “the transition everyone knew we needed to make”.

    McKibben told the recent Global Smart Energy Summit 2020 has been a year of “extraordinary convergence”, from the images of Australia’s bushfires, seen around the world on New Year’s Day – “like something out of Hieronymus Bosch” – to unprecedented developments such as China’s commitment to achieve net zero emissions by 2060, the EU’s pledge to make its Green Deal and Є100bn Just Transition Fund the centrepiece of post-Covid recovery, and the US $15tn divested from fossil fuels.

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  • 10.25.20

    ‘We had nudity on the greens!’ The battle over Britain’s golf courses

    The country’s fairways take up a huge amount of green space – and many were thrown open to the public during lockdown. Should that change be made permanent?

    Hollingbury golf course is a big splodge of green bleeding into Brighton’s grey urban sprawl. For more than a century, its 18 holes have risen above the seaside city towards the ruins of an iron age hillfort, which is now enclosed by holes nine, 12, 13, and 14. From Hollingbury’s highest point, it is possible to look west on a clear day and see the hills of the Isle of Wight.

    As housing has spread around the course, which is owned by the council, so has tension between golfers and walkers, who are permitted to cut across it on a network of footpaths and old drovers’ tracks. Relations seem calm on the autumn day I visit, but I gather “Fore!” is not the only four-letter exclamation to have bounced along the manicured fairways.

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