Inside Climate News - Today's Climate

  • 11.25.20

    What the Janet Yellen Pick for Treasury Means for Climate Policy

    Washington Post

    Janet Yellen, President-elect Joe Biden's pick to run the treasury, may play a crucial role in getting corporations to take global warming seriously, if she's confirmed by the Senate, The Washington Post reports. Yellen, a former chair of the Federal Reserve, has sounded off on the need to address climate change, and her selection is another sign of the Biden administration's intent to tackle the climate crisis.

     

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  • 11.25.20

    As Special Envoy for Climate, John Kerry Will Be No Stranger to International Climate Negotiations

    InsideClimate News

    The Montreal Protocol's Kigali Amendment is a little-known climate accord meant to phase out the use of hydrofluorocarbon refrigerants, climate super-pollutants that would otherwise have caused as much as 0.5 degrees Celsius of additional global warming by 2050. John Kerry, President-elect Joe Biden's new climate envoy, helped make it happen.

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  • 11.25.20

    The Swinomish Tribe Is an Ancient People With a Modern Climate Plan

    Washington Post

    For 10,000 years, the Swinomish tribe have relied on the bounty of salmon and shellfish in the waters of northwestern Washington. But those fish populations have diminished in recent years, as climate change warms the oceans and stresses ecosystems. The tribe has responded with an ambitious, multipronged climate plan, The Washington Post reports, prompting 50 other Native tribes to follow suit.

     

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NY Times - Global Warming and Climate Change

  • 11.28.20

    Wildfire Smoke Is Poisoning California’s Kids. Some Pay a Higher Price.

    Fires are making the state’s air more dangerous. How much that hurts depends largely on where you live and how much money your family has.
  • 11.27.20

    Here Are The Facts About Heaters for Both Indoors and Outdoors

    Here are facts about heaters (for outside and inside) and climate change.
  • 11.25.20

    Illegal Tampering by Diesel Pickup Owners Is Worsening Pollution, E.P.A. Says

    An E.P.A. investigation has found that the owners of more than half a million diesel pickup trucks have installed devices to defeat emissions controls and boost pollution.

The Guardian - Keep it in the Ground

  • 11.27.20

    Ancient whale skeleton found in Thailand holds clues to climate change

    Scientists hope remains, thought to be up to 5,000 years old, will deepen knowledge of whale species and of rising sea levels

    A whale skeleton thought to be up to 5,000 years old has been discovered, almost perfectly preserved, by researchers in Thailand.

    The skeleton, believed to be a Bryde’s whale, was found in Samut Sakhon, west of Bangkok. Researchers have excavated 80% of the remains and have so far identified 19 complete vertebrae, five ribs, a shoulder blade and fins. The skeleton measures 12 metres (39ft), with a skull that is 3 metres long.

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  • 11.27.20

    The week in wildlife – in pictures

    The best of the week’s wildlife pictures from around the world, including desert-dwelling sheep and a plant that has evolved to hide from humans

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  • 11.27.20

    Escaped infected Danish mink could spread Covid in wild

    Scientists fear fur farm animals in wild could create ‘lasting’ Covid reservoir that could then spread back to humans

    Escaped mink carrying the virus that causes Covid-19 could potentially infect Denmark’s wild animals, raising fears of a permanent Sars-CoV-2 reservoir from which new virus variants could be reintroduced to humans.

    Denmark, the world’s largest exporter of mink fur, announced in early November that it would cull the country’s farmed mink after discovering a mutated version of the virus that could have jeopardised the efficacy of future vaccines.

    Around 10 million mink have been killed to date. Fur industry sources expect the fur from the remaining 5 million to 7 million mink will be sold.

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