Inside Climate News - Today's Climate

  • 02.14.19

    With Democrats in Charge, House Science Committee Talks About Climate Science

    InsideClimate News

    The House Science Committee devoted its first hearing of the new Congress to climate change, a discussion that showed a subtle shift among some Republicans toward acknowledging that scientific research points to human-driven global warming. 

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  • 02.14.19

    Fossil Fuels, Not Wildfires, Biggest Source of a Key Arctic Climate Pollutant

    InsideClimate News

    Most of the black carbon that's helping warm and melt the Arctic is coming from the burning of fossil fuels in coal-fired power plants, vehicles and factories, rather than from wildfires, according to new research. The findings could help countries take more effective steps to control the climate pollutant. 

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  • 02.14.19

    EPA Air Policy Official Stayed in Close Touch with His Former Law Firm, New Emails Show

    Washington Post

    Bill Wehrum, the EPA's top air policy official, stayed in close touch with employees at his former law firm, some of whom have business before the agency, according to newly disclosed emails. The emails are part of ongoing litigation with the Sierra Club. An official with that group says the messages show Wehrum continued to back the industries he had worked for.

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NY Times - Global Warming and Climate Change

  • 02.15.19

    Australia’s Burning, Flooding, Disastrous New Normal

    We are a land of proudly resilient people. But in an age of climate change, we can’t just hike up our Stubbies and move on.
  • 02.14.19

    Skipping School to Save the Earth

    Inspired by a 16-year-old Swede, thousands of young people are expected to take Friday off to march for action on climate change.
  • 02.14.19

    E.P.A. Will Study Limits on Cancer-Linked Chemicals. Critics Say the Plan Delays Action.

    The agency said it will start work by year's end on a plan to address limits on the chemicals, known as PFAS, which are commonly used in cookware, pizza boxes, stain repellants and fire retardants.

The Guardian - Keep it in the Ground

  • 02.14.19

    Emissions reduction fund could be used to upgrade 40-year-old coal-fired power plant

    The owners of the Vales Point power station, which produces 6.9m tonnes of emissions annually, want to extend operations by 20 years

    The emissions reduction fund, which is at the heart of the Morrison government’s climate change policy, could be used to help pay for an upgrade at a 40-year-old coal-fired power plant after its owners successfully applied to register under the scheme.

    In a step that underscores the political divide over emissions policy, Vales Point power station in New South Wales was registered in August for a proposal to improve some of its turbines. It is the first stage in it being allowed to bid against land owners and other businesses for climate funding.

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  • 02.14.19

    Pollutionwatch: carmakers must come clean on diesel pollution

    European auditors have found diesel cars are passing exhaust tests but causing more pollution

    If your car seatbelt was designed to work in a test, but not an accident, it would be a major moral failure by the manufacturer and perhaps grounds for prosecution. The situation for diesel exhausts is similar. Last week, the European court of auditors found diesel cars had been designed to pass ever tighter exhaust tests, but caused much more air pollution on our roads.

    Some produced 50% more carbon dioxide (CO2) and more than 10 times as many nitrogen oxides (NOx). Extra CO2 affects the climate, but avoids climate taxes, and the extra NOX harms our health. Enforcement is down to each country, but we are still waiting. The EU has launched legal action against Spain, Germany, Luxembourg and the UK for not prosecuting Volkswagen for selling cars with cheat software.

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  • 02.14.19

    Meal kits cut food waste but packaging is a problem, study finds

    Deliveries ‘almost always’ use more energy than buying ingredients from supermarket

    Home delivery meal kits can slash food waste by more than two-thirds, but suppliers need to switch to reusable packaging to make them environmentally friendly, researchers say.

    Tailor-made meal kits save waste by providing people with precise amounts of fresh ingredients for chosen recipes, meaning leftovers are minimised and less food goes off before people have a chance to use it.

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