Inside Climate News - Today's Climate

  • 04.03.20

    Above-Average Atlantic Hurricane Season Predicted, Including a Possible Major Hurricane Strike

    The Washington Post

    Researchers at Colorado State University expect an active 2020 hurricane season, with a high chance for a major hurricane to make landfall in the U.S. Warm sea surface temperatures and the lack of an El Niño in the Pacific Ocean are some of the factors supporting this prediction.

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  • 04.03.20

    Coronavirus Could Trigger Biggest Fall in Carbon Emissions Since World War II

    Reuters

    The coronavirus pandemic could result in a 5 percent drop in carbon dioxide emissions worldwide, significantly larger than the 1.4 percent drop during the 2008 recession. No crisis has affected the energy sector this much since World War II, Reuters reports. 

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  • 04.03.20

    San Francisco Bans Reusable Bags in Coronavirus Fight

    The Hill

    San Francisco, a city that prohibited single-use plastic bags in 2007, has now banned reusable bags in grocery stores in an effort to reduce coronavirus exposure. 

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NY Times - Global Warming and Climate Change

  • 04.05.20

    As Himalayas Warm, Nepal’s Climate Migrants Struggle to Survive

    Pushed out of their village by a drought and lack of food, a group of Nepalis are fighting to amplify the voices of those forced to relocate by the planet’s warming.
  • 04.03.20

    FEMA, Racing to Provide Virus Relief, Is Running Short on Front-Line Staff

    The agency leading the coronavirus response nationwide is facing a staffing crunch and has closed its training facilities to avoid spreading the virus, officials say.
  • 04.03.20

    E.P.A. Threatens Legal Action Against Sellers of Fake Coronavirus Cleaners

    The federal government is asking online retailers to take unregistered products that falsely claim protection from coronavirus off the market.

The Guardian - Keep it in the Ground

  • 04.06.20

    Teesdale's precious slopes of arctic flora: Country diary, 10 April 1970

    10 April 1970 Soil conditions and a severe climate have produced a unique habitat for a host of delicate plants in the North Pennines

    DURHAM: Leaving the hedgerowed landscapes far behind, the road finally rose beyond Langdon Beck and even the thin shelter of the stone dikes to the open, snowswept moorland. The wind came unhampered across the highest edge of the Pennines, the iciest of blasts from the north-west corner of the sky. Down below Widdybank Fell the concrete slabs of the new dam at Cow Green neared completion yet still looked insignificant in the great basin of the fells. Lorries roared over the tarmac bringing whinstone from near-by quarries as part of the dam construction. A footpath led down to the falls of Cauldron Snout across some of the most precious slopes of arctic flora in this country. The delicate variation of soil conditions, changing in small compass from bare volcanics to sugar limestone, from peat bogs and to thin glacial drift, together with this most severe of climates produces a unique habitat for the gentian and sandwort, alpine bistort and hair sedge, and a host of other delicate flora which survive here without competition.

    Related: Tiny flower at home in a landscape forged by fire and ice

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  • 04.06.20

    Country diary: winning the trust of a friendly robin

    Dartmoor, Devon: Though one of our most approachable birds, it has taken months to persuade this garden robin to eat out of my hand

    It landed with the lightest of pressure, toes thin as fuse wire splayed on my outstretched fingers. With eyes closed, one might have mistaken the weight for the touch of falling raindrops.

    There, on my upturned hand, a robin – my friendly garden robin. Dark pupils watched me as it tucked in to the seed mix on my palm, picking sunflower kernels from the pile one at a time.

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  • 04.05.20

    'Bad news': radiation spikes 16 times above normal after forest fire near Chernobyl

    The blaze started on Saturday close to the site of the world’s worst ever nuclear disaster, Ukrainian officials say

    Ukraine has reported a spike in radiation levels in the restricted zone around Chernobyl, scene of the world’s worst nuclear accident, caused by a forest fire.

    “There is bad news – radiation is above normal in the fire’s centre,” Yegor Firsov, head of Ukraine’s state ecological inspection service, said on Facebook on Sunday.

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