Inside Climate News - Today's Climate

  • 01.18.19

    Pentagon Report Warns Climate Change Threatens Key U.S. Military Bases

    InsideClimate News

    A new Pentagon report identifies significant risks from climate change at scores of military bases and says the Defense Department is taking protective measures against the looming threat. But Democrats in Congress, who requested the report in 2017 along with some Republican colleagues, said it lacks detail and shows the Trump administration is failing to take climate change seriously as a national security threat.

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  • 01.18.19

    Coal Ash Contaminating Groundwater in at least 22 States, Utility Reports Show

    InsideClimate News

    At dozens of power plants across the country, utilities have found coal ash pollution severe enough to force them to propose cleanup plans. The plans are likely to become the next front in a decades-long battle over how to manage one of the nation's largest industrial waste streams. Some states are planning additional actions.

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  • 01.18.19

    Love Coffee? It's Another Reason to Care About Climate Change

    InsideClimate News

    Climate Change and deforestation are threatening most of the world's wild coffee species. With rising global temperatures already presenting risks to coffee farmers, two studies published this week should serve as a warning to growers and coffee-drinkers everywhere.

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NY Times - Global Warming and Climate Change

  • 01.21.19

    Greenland’s Melting Ice Nears a ‘Tipping Point,’ Scientists Say

    With the Arctic warming rapidly, ice loss in Greenland is accelerating and may soon be a major factor in rising sea levels, according to a new study.
  • 01.18.19

    Brace for the Polar Vortex; It May Be Visiting More Often

    A researcher says that as the climate changes, “winter is shortening, but you’re getting these more intensive periods in that shorter winter.”
  • 01.18.19

    To Get This Artist’s Message, You Have to Look Really Closely

    With “This Land,” David Opdyke melds art and environmental activism, hoping to inspire urgent changes in vision, one postcard, and viewer, at a time.

The Guardian - Keep it in the Ground

  • 01.22.19

    Drone surveillance spots sharks off Sydney's beaches: 'It's a big one' – video

    Jason Iggleden, the creator of a new app called Drone Shark, talks to Guardian Australia about why he decided to start simultaneously filming surfers on Sydney's eastern beaches while monitoring for sharks.

    The app, which was designed for surfers who want footage of themselves catching waves, is a 'first in the world', says Iggleden. It also reports on surf spots and conditions, and provides drone footage of predators lurking off the beach. 

    Iggleden believes drones are a more effective and ecological way of keeping surfers and swimmers safe than shark nets, drumlines and helicopter patrols.

    If Iggleden spots a shark, he contacts lifeguards, or if it's urgent, uses his own megaphone to shout out to surfers.


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  • 01.22.19

    Country diary: wild cats and mole crickets are long gone but the polecat's back

    Fermyn Woods, Northamptonshire: The mix of species shifts between seasons and over longer periods. The wild cat is gone but there are plans to restore the chequered skipper butterfly

    The leafless trees sway under grey skies as we stride confidently through these old hunting woods. Despite the entertaining flocks of gleaning tits, goldcrest and blackcap, I find myself recalling the comparative bioabundance of the wood in spring and summer, when the rides are full of flowers, fluttery flies and summering birds. The interactions we have with other species define and enrich our nature experiences and are profoundly modified by changes to the mix of species present; between seasons, but also over longer periods of time.

    In 1712, when John Morton published his 600-page The Natural History of Northamptonshire, he reported interactions perhaps now gone for ever. Mole crickets lived by the river at Kingsthorpe, and “common ground-pine” grew in Helpston quarries, while water germander (Teucrium scordium) must have been frequent in fen ditches, as he says it gave a garlic-like taste to the milk of cows feeding upon it. Three centuries later and all three species are extinct in Northamptonshire.

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  • 01.21.19

    Yellow crazy ant invasion threatens Queensland world heritage rainforest as funding dries up

    Program holding ants at bay in wet tropics suffers from lack of government funding commitment

    Funding to keep a voracious invasive ant from establishing super colonies in Australia’s wet tropics world heritage area has less than six months of funding left, risking its future, Guardian Australia has been told.

    The Wet Tropics Management Authority (WTMA), which manages the vast world heritage area in north Queensland, is asking state and federal governments for a $6m a year package for the next seven years – enough, the authority says, for it to finish the job of eradicating the yellow crazy ant.

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